Nov 092015
 

What, exactly, is a headphone song? The definition changes depending on who you are.

For audiophiles, a headphone song—or album, for that matter—is a work that is so exquisite that it demands you listen to each beautifully recorded note under a sonic microscope. Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue” fits that bill, the song and the album.

For others, a great “headphone work” is one that makes an intimate album more intimate (such as Bob Dylan’s original mono recordings), or a loud album louder (Rage Against the Machine’s debut effort).

We’re an unsubtle and hyperactive bunch here at Guitar World, so our favorite headphone songs seem to be those that have a lot of activity in the stereo field. As silly as it sounds, we love it every time a guitar solo takes a shortcut through our skulls as it zooms from one ear to the other.

Anyway, with the help of the gang at Blue Microphones, we’ve selected 16 of our favorite headphone songs—and we’re asking you to vote for your favorites of the bunch! We’ve even launched a quick readers’ poll—a bracket of 16 as opposed to our usual bracket of 32—so the tunes can shoot it out on GuitarWorld.com.

If you don’t know what we’re talking about—or you’ve never experienced any of the great songs listed in the bracket below—we suggest you go home, put on your best set of ‘phones, turn out the lights, turn up the volume and prepare to have your mind blown sky high. And vote, of course!

Note: All song titles used in this poll refer to the stereo studio versions, unless otherwise noted.

Enjoy our Best Rock Headphone Song Ever poll, which is sponsored by Blue Microphones!

Today’s Matchup

“Comfortably Numb,” Pink Floyd

“I banged out five or six solos,” Dave Gilmour says. “From there I just followed my usual procedure, which is to listen back to each solo and make a chart, noting which bits are good. Then, by following the chart, I create one great composite solo by whipping one fader up, then another fader, jumping from phrase to phrase until everything flows together. That’s the way we did it on ‘Comfortably Numb.’”

“Dogman,” King’s X

One of the most underrated hard rock acts of all time, King’s X have been creating progressive, funky, heavy music with Beatle-esque harmonies for more than 30 years. “Dogman,” the lead-off song from the band’s 1994 album of the same name, features their signature grungy undertones over a stripped-down hypnotic groove. While bassist Doug Pinnick is screaming his collective heart out, guitarist Ty Tabor’s fretwork is reminiscent of Brian May, Alex Lifeson and Ace Frehley.

Vote Now!

Best Rock Headphone Song Ever: “Comfortably Numb” (Pink Floyd) Vs. “Dogman” (King’s X)

Behold the Latest Bracket!

Coming soon!

How the Bracket Was Compiled

hat.jpg

Here’s how the bracket was—very unscientifically—compiled.

We drew the songs’ names out of a hat (It was, in fact, a Quebec Nordiques baseball cap, which is called a casquette in Quebec) to help us create our bracket, which is available for your viewing pleasure below. Obviously, none of these songs are ranked or come from a previously compiled list, so we chose purely random matchups to have as little impact as possible on the final outcome.

Remember that, as with any poll, genre might occasionally clash against genre, so you’ll just need to decide which song has (or has had) the most to offer within its genre.

As always, you can vote only once per matchup (once per device, that is), and we’ll be posting matchups pretty much every day of the month, sometimes more than once per day, just to give you an early

Additional Content

Readers' Poll: Best Rock Headphone Song Ever — "Comfortably Numb" (Pink Floyd) Vs. "Dogman" (King's X)
Source: Guitar World